According to the Bumbershoot website:

What is the camera policy at Bumbershoot?
Cameras are not allowed at Bumbershoot—please leave them at home.

So, there’s no public photography allowed at Bumbershoot this year?

The best word I can come up with for this is ludicrous.

Anyone out there have any more info? What’s the deal here? And how are they going to be enforcing it?

(And anyone feel like getting together on one of the days and blatantly defying the ban?)

(via Seattle Metroblogging)

12 thoughts on “No Cameras at Bumbershoot?

  1. Guess I’m not going to Bumbershoot this year. Was sort of on the bubble, but I can’t really see the point if they’re going to be obnoxious about cameras.

  2. I see that they’re allowing cell phones. How are they going to limit the use of camera phones? Seems really, really silly.

  3. Speaking of pictures…..when do we get to see the new place??? Sorry im not more angry about Bumbersoot. After last year, I will NEVER go again.

  4. I emailed Bumpershoot through their contact us link and got a reply within 24 hours. Here is their email to me (unedited)

    Hi Tim,

    Cameras may come on to the grounds, as long as they
    are not professional quality, but may NOT be used in any of the indoor
    venues and/or to photograph the artists. This is a contractual
    obligation we have to the artists.

    Please let me know if you have any further questions.

    Thank you,
    Sara Green
    One Reel
    http://www.onereel.org

  5. Cameras may come on to the grounds, as long as they are not professional quality, but may NOT be used in any of the indoor venues and/or to photograph the artists.

    The second part of this doesn’t bother me that much (it’s been pretty standard for the last few years at Bumbershoot), but the first part…”not professional quality,” huh? Just what in the world does that mean?

    I’m guessing it means that they’re imposing an entirely arbitrary restriction against (D)SLR cameras, while allowing point and shoots, which is ridiculous. My current “point and shoot” (the Canon A95) has features and resolution that rival and possibly exceed the “professional”/prosumer digital cameras of just a few years ago.

    More than that, though, is that the camera is just a piece of equipment. I’ve seen plenty of absolutely stunning pictures from professional photographers taken on everything from (D)SLRs to digital “point and shoot” cameras to “toy” cameras like the Lomos or Holgas. I’ve also seen plenty of average, everyday photos coming from people who don’t know the first thing about photography but are rich enough to be able to afford a top-of-the-line piece of equipment.

    In a way, I find imposing an arbitrary and incredibly vague standard of no “professional quality” cameras to be even more clueless than the simple (if ridiculous) across-the-board ban on all cameras that the website declares.

    Grrrrrr.

    Speaking of pictures…..when do we get to see the new place???

    Soon, I promise! I’ve not been spending a lot of time on the ‘puter recently, as I adjust my puttering schedule around actually living with someone. It’s a bit of a change, after all. ;) It shouldn’t be too much longer, though.

  6. That’s bullshit. I want to know WHICH artists it is in their contract with because it for damn sure isn’t in all of them. Hell Mike Doughty even ALLOWS taping of his shows but recording gear isn’t allowed in because of other bands.

    So which band is the cause of this arbitrary and stupid rule. I’ve heard it at other clubs and I just laugh at the rediculousness of it all. I wonder if it would do any good to take a press pass with me.

  7. I actually got to photograph Bumbershoot this year for a local newspaper and Sara et. al. were very accommodating, but I had a number of problems with the implementation of their photography policy. In particular, the press packet said that a list of artists and their photography restrictions would be available, but it wasn’t. The staff monitoring the shows also were not informed about photography policy. Finally, I was shooting using a very fast telephoto lens (Nikon 200mm F2) specifically to remain out-of-sight but there were more than a few people with point-and-shoots blatantly violating the no-flash-indoors reg.

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