Enterprise: Terra Nova

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

This week the Enterprise was off to “Terra Nova”:

The Enterprise crew alters course to investigate the mystery of Terra Nova, a legendary Earth colony whose inhabitants mysteriously disappeared decades ago. But when they arrive, they confront descendants of the colonists who have become more alien than Archer could ever have imagined.

Not bad, actually — definitely better overall than last week’s episode. I liked Archer’s frustration in being able to deal with the situation he ended up in — especially when he started fuming about how, “If I can’t make first contact with a group of humans…I don’t deserve to be on this ship.” T’Pol’s handling of Archer in the situation room was wonderful, too — I’m still not entirely sure just how serious her suggesting the stun grenades was, and how much of that was playing devil’s advocate.

Enterprise: Unexpected

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

Benefits to actually having a TV — while the reception is pretty cruddy, it does allow me to watch the single TV show I’ve got any real interest in, Enterprise. Last night’s episode was “Unexpected”:

When Tucker is dispatched to assist an alien ship with its power source problems, he is delighted to have a friendly encounter with one of the ship’s female engineers. But after discovering that their special moment has resulted in his becoming pregnant, he realizes he’s had an unwitting experience with alien sex. Now it’s up to the Archer and the crew to return the rapidly growing alien baby to its mother.

Definite mixed feelings about this episode, for me. It was enjoyable enough, and certainly fun to watch, but it definitely had a few moments that concern me a bit.

Things I liked: Trip’s attitude throughout the show — I really liked the understated, very dry approach he took. Archer’s reactions were hilarious, the number of times he had to work to stifle a smirk were hilarious. I do have to admit, too, to a thrill when the Klingon D-7 Battlecruiser appeared on the Enterprise’s viewscreen. I’ve always liked that ship (and Klingon design in general — though they were finally upstaged by the Next Generation-era Romulan Warbird…but I digress), and seeing it in action again was quite nice. On the other hand…

Things I didn’t like: We’re four episodes in, and they’ve already succumbed to the temptation to get some sort of Holodeck on the show. Okay, so the Enterprise didn’t end up with it, but still — is it that difficult to come up with original ideas? And would the Klingons really be appeased/tempted by the possibility of being given holographic technology? Seems to me that they’d be more interested in the cloaking technology that the alien ship was using. Besides, they seemed far to easily dissuaded — it’s hard for me to believe that given the level of tension between the Federation and the Klingon Empire during Kirk’s time, that any Klingon 100 years earlier, with far less contact with Humans to draw from, would put up with Archer’s down-home “Aw, shucks, Paw,” attitude for any longer than the time it would take to send a torpedo up the Enterprise’s tailpipe.

Anyway, taken as a whole, it was an okay episode, with some fairly amusing moments — but for someone who’s been watching Star Trek practically since birth, I really wonder how this show’s going to integrate its story arc with the known back story of the Trek universe. So far, they seem to be doing a fairly shaky job of that, which worries me. Ah, well — we’re also only four episodes in, and none of the Trek series have really hit their stride until somewhere between their second and fourth year, so I supposed it’s a little early to write “Enterprise” off just yet.

Still….

To boldly go…

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

…where three television series and nine movies have gone before.

Or something like that, right?

But hey — they’re doing it with style. Gotta admit, I thought last nights premiere of Enterprise, “Broken Bow,”, was pretty darn cool. Finally, it really does look like we’ve got a new entry to the Star Trek universe that just might be able to carry on the torch and keep viewers interested. It’s about time.

Things I liked:

The ship — especially the interiors. It really does look something like a cross between a starship and a submarine. Very cramped interiors, walkways going around the various parts of engineering…very nice look. Besides, I’ve always liked the design of the Star Trek universe.

The technology — they seem do be doing a credible job of placing the technology somewhere between what we have today and what was thought the future could look like in the original series, from the sliders on the transporter to T’Pol’s viewer on the science station. With nobody really trusting the transporters yet, it’ll be nice to have extra-vehicular missions using shuttlecraft the majority of the time (one of my favorite TOS episodes was The Galileo Seven, a premise which wouldn’t have worked without a shuttlecraft — sometimes the transporters made things a bit too convenient, I think). The use of an actual grappling hook device rather than a tractor beam was a very nice touch.

The cast — I have to say, I think they just may have done a good job here. I wasn’t sure what to think when I heard that Scott Bakula was going to be the new captain, but I ended up really liking Cpt. Scott Archer. The rest of the regulars came off well too — about my only reservations are with Ensign Hoshi Sato (while the constant nervousness about whether the ship is about to explode around her ears is amusing, the writers will have to tread carefully not to make it just flat-out annoying) and Dr. Phlox (reminds me a bit too much of characters like Neelix [VOY] and the early Ferengi [TNG/DS9] — good ideas that didn’t hold up well over the long run), but as this is solely based on a 2-hour first episode, these characters could become much more than they seem in a season or two. I was also pleasantly surprised with Sub-Commander T’Pol. Considering the jumpsuit they’ve put her in just screams out, “Look at me! I’m the resident token sex object!” she actually ended up with a character much more thought out than I at first expected. She also has that wonderful trick of managing to smile without actually doing it — I think it’s something in the eyes, but it’s something I haven’t really seen an actor pull off with a Vulcan character since Spock and Sarek.

The fact that the show is presented in 1.78:1 widescreen. Very cool — now if only I had a high-def TV and receiver to watch the thing on!

Things i’m iffy on:

Okay, what was the point to the decontamination scene? Or, rather, was there a point beyond titillation? Admittedly, it wasn’t bad as far as prime-time titillation goes, and I have to give them props — not only did they have T’Pol strip down to her skivvies, but they also had Commander Charles Tucker in there (either for the women or the gay men in the audience, or both) — but it seemed out of place, and clumsily done. Either the two of them were just helping each other with the decontamination gel, or they were flirting, but the scene played like a clumsy mix of both. Ah, well — at least it was good eye candy, right?

The opening theme. Y’know, assuming I ever get in a situation where I can watch this show on a weekly basis, I think that song is going to grate on me more and more every time. The visuals during the credit sequence are nice, I like the exploration theme — but did they have to go to some horrid, cheezy, adult-contemporary soft-rock ballad? Ugh. That can go, as far as I’m concerned — and it can go as far away as possible.

Overall

A good, solid B+, I think. I’ll catch more episodes when I can — whenever that may be — we just might finally have another worthy contender to the Star Trek universe here.

Enterprise

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

Ooers, yeah — one more thing. Tonight’s the premiere episode of Enterprise, the new Star Trek series. I’m hoping to be able to catch it, Damon has said I can hang out over at his place tonight to see the show. Hopefully it’ll be worthwhile — I’ve gotta admit, I’m intrigued by what I’ve read so far. Tonight’s episode is Broken Bow, where we get to launch not only the series, but also the first warp capable Enterprise, and Klingon/Human relations. Should be interesting!

Gladiators, gladiators, gladiators…and spacemen

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

Not much went on today…other than the usual purchases of DVD’s to add to the ever growing collection. :) So — on with today’s bits (because I’m sure you’re all just incredibly captivated by what I choose to spend my money on…).

Spartacus: Yet another that I’ve been crazy enough to purchase sight unseen, based solely on the recommendations I’ve gotten on it — though it did seem to go quite nicely with my recent purchases of Ben-Hur and Gladiator. Besides, it’s a Stanley Kubrick film, who I generally really like, and the DVD is part of the Criterion Collection, who consistently does really incredible work with their releases. This is a 2-disc set with an absolute ton of extras…looking forward to spending quite a few hours delving into this.

Star Trek TOS Vol. 21: Finally, Paramount releases more Star Trek episodes! I’m so hoping that when they decide to put out Next Generation and Deep Space 9 they do it in season sets rather than trickling out two discs of two episodes each every few months like they’ve been doing. Anyway, enough of the soapbox…this volume contains two of the most known comedic shows that Star Trek made — I, Mudd, and The Trouble With Tribbles.

Star Trek TOS Vol. 22: Kind of funny, actually, since the first of the two episodes on this one fits right in with the gladiatorial theme I’ve got going. Two episodes on this disc, as usual — Bread and Circuses and Journey to Babel.

Okay, that’s it. It’s almost 2am, and I’m tired. Time to head off to bed.

The collection grows again…

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

…like that’s really a surprise to anyone who either knows me or is actually bored enough to read this babble on a regular basis. :) Today’s acquisitions:

The Insider: The latest movie for me to pick up sight unseen. However, I’m becoming more and more of a fan of Michael Mann‘s directing (Manhunter, Heat, The Last of the Mohicans), and when you add in a cast including Russel Crowe and Al Pacino, I don’t figure I can do too badly…the 7 Oscar nominations don’t hurt, either. Was hoping to watch this tonight, but I think it’s a bit late for that…sometime soon, though.

Star Trek: TOS Vol. 19 (with The Changeling and The Apple) and Star Trek: TOS Vol. 20 (with Mirror, Mirror and The Deadly Years): Hey, I can’t help it…I was brought up on Star Trek! My only disappointment here is that Paramount is releasing these so slowly…2 discs, with 2 episodes each, every couple of months. Ugh. Disheartening to see it done this way when Fox does such an excellent job releasing The X-Files in season sets. Hopefully we’ll be able to talk Paramount into adopting this approach when they start putting TNG DS9 and VOY on DVD.

Other than that, a fairly uneventful day (in other words, pretty normal). I did get a call from the temp agency that confirmed I’m on their list, and from the sounds of it there might be something coming up soon. I can hope….

Doing Trekkies (-ers?) proud

This entry was published 21 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

Having been a fan of Star Trek practically since birth, I’m not sure it would be possible for me not to be excited about this little tidbit of information. It’s been known for a while now that Paramount was going back and doing some work on ‘Star Trek: The Motion Picture’ for its upcoming DVD release — we just weren’t entirely sure just what that meant.

Well, this article from the New Times Los Angeles Online website gives a lot of really good information on just what we can look forward to. Check it out, if you’re at all interested.

[From Usenet: 2.18.99 0000]

This entry was published 23 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

[Note: This was originally a post to the alt.tv.star-trek.voyager Usenet newsgroup. I’m including it here for completeness. Originally archived here.]

  1. THE MUSIC WAS LACKING BIG TIME! Music is a powerful tool to help a movie have depth, feeling and emotion. The music could have been so much more deep and could have added so much more to the feeling of the movie.

I’d have to watch it again (hurrah for VCR’s) to really make a judgment, but there was at least one instance where it really caught my ear. During one of the shots of the shuttle approaching the borgplex, there were a couple low, twangy notes like someone plucking two of the lower strings on a piano. Caught my ear mainly because the last time I can remember hearing that theme used was in ST:TMP as the Enterprise is making its entrance into V’ger. Visually similar shots (though the one in ST:TMP was much more visually impressive (okay, and about half an hour longer) than VOY:DF’s borgplex entrance), good use of old themes. Which brought another thought into my feeble little brain. In advance, please forgive me if this has been hashed and re-hashed many times over in the past, I just subscribed to these groups after watching VOY:DF.

Has anyone ever thought much of the possibility that the planet that transformed the Voyager probe into V’ger was the Borg home planet, before they got to the point of striking out on their own and assimilating everything that sneezed twice in their general direction? The general purpose seems to be very similar — it’s not that big a step from “learn all that is learnable, collect all the possible knowledge in the universe, then merge with the creator” to the Borg’s assimilation of other species and knowledge bases into their own. Additionally, it was hypothesized in ST:TMP that the Voyager probe had fell through a black hole to this ‘machine planet’, been repaired/reprogrammed there, and sent away. Mix in a little time distortion along with the black hole, and V’ger could have been sent on its voyage back to Earth long before the Borg advanced to a point where they could move out on their own, and still have time to fill its databanks and make it back home. Just a thought…would be interested to hear if others have explored this line of reasoning. Would love to see it explored in a show at some point, but that may just be fanboy drooling (grin).

Incidentally, what happened to all the knowledge that V’ger transmitted to Earth?

And while I’m at it, I suppose I could throw in the Transformers homeworld/Borg homeworld parallels, too…. Are there any? Probably…I’m just blowing smoke out of my ass at this point, but if I can think of it now, it’s probably been beaten to death before now…

[From Usenet: 12.26.98 0000]

This entry was published 24 years ago. Since that time the information may have become outdated or my beliefs may have changed. I strive to grow as a person as I age, and I likely posted things in the past that I wouldn't post today in the same way or at all. In general, assume I've moved politically leftward as time has gone by.

[Note: This was originally a post to the rec.arts.startrek.fandom Usenet newsgroup. I’m including it here for completeness. Originally archived here.]

Need help from someone out there – found somthing in my family’s house, trying to figure out if it’s worth anything.

Star Trek Book and Record set from Peter Pan Industries/Power Records (catalog #BR513), featuring the stories A Mirror for Futility and The Time Stealer, copyright 1976, still in it’s original shrinkwrap, unopened. One small (less than 1cm square) notch taken out of top right hand corner, otherwise undamaged.

Any ideas? Please e-mail me at djwo…@geocities.com, as I don’t frequent this newsgroup.